Grades 9-10 ELA Online Resources

Grades 9-10 ELA Online Resources

 

General Reading/Writing/Grammar Resources:

Khan Academy Reading/Writing Practice

Khan Academy Grammar Practice

Purdue OWL: The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects.
Grammar Bytes: Grammar Instruction With Attitude 
 
Florida Standards Assessments: test info, practice tests, and more.
Florida teacher James Mulhern’s FSA information/resources site

 

 

STANDARDS-BASED TUTORIALS FROM FLORIDASTUDENTS.ORG

9-10  grade FLDOE ELA standards-based tutorials:

Tutorial 1

Learn several ways to gather knowledge about an unknown word in order to determine its meaning, ways that include context clues, word parts, and dictionary skills. Determining the meaning of unknown words will help you increase your understanding of texts that you read, and it will also help you use words more accurately in your own writing. The text passages used in this interactive tutorial provide vivid descriptions of Florida. (LAFS.910.L.3.4, LAFS.910.L.3.6, LAFS.910.RI.2.4)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/128516

Tutorial 2

It’s hard to think of a place where making a careful and persuasive argument has more importance than in the courtroom. In Harper Lee’s highly successful novel To Kill a Mockingbird, she writes one of the most famous courtroom speeches ever written. In this tutorial we are going to take a closer look at this speech by breaking down each of its parts to understand why it was so powerful. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to analyze the ways in which the rhetoric of this speech was particularly effective and how the content of the text contributed to its purpose and persuasiveness. (LAFS.910.RL.1.1, LAFS.910.RL.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/126567

 

Tutorial 3

In this tutorial we will review some vocabulary strategies to use when you are unsure about the meaning of words in a text. We will also review the literary term tone. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to apply your skills to determine the meaning of unknown words in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. You should also be able to analyze the words and phrases that Lincoln uses in order to determine his tone in the Gettysburg Address. (LAFS.910.L.3.4, LAFS.910.RI.2.4, LAFS.910.RI.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119136

Tutorial 4

By the end of this tutorial you should be able to explain how a speaker uses rhetoric to advance his purpose. To achieve the final objective, you will learn how to determine a speaker’s purpose, identify different uses of rhetoric, and explain the impact of rhetoric on the speaker’s purpose. This tutorial will use excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress" from 1917.  (LAFS.910.RI.1.1, LAFS.910.RI.2.6)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/118799

Tutorial 5

In this tutorial, we will read a few selected excerpts from texts written by Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel. As we learn to use the following skills, we will look carefully at his words so that we may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine the central idea of a text. You should also be able to identify the important supporting details of a central idea, as well as explain how the central idea is refined by specific details. (LAFS.910.RI.1.1, LAFS.910.RI.1.2)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119150

Tutorial 6

By the end of this tutorial you should be able to define and identify several literary elements, including theme, topic, and plot summary, and explain the differences between them. In this tutorial, you’re going to focus on one of the main characters from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird—the character of Scout—to analyze how what she says, thinks, and does relates to topics found in the novel. Next, you’ll be able to determine how what Scout says, thinks, and does develops important themes of the novel. Finally, you should be able to use these skills to develop a theme statement. (LAFS.910.RL.1.2, LAFS.910.RL.1.3, LAFS.910.RL.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/123958

Tutorial 7

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify a concept addressed in texts from two different time periods in U.S. history and distinguish the similarities and differences between the ways the texts treat this concept. The texts featured in this tutorial are the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. (LAFS.910.RI.3.9, LAFS.910.RI.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/122945

Tutorial 8

By the end of this tutorial you should be able to define the term “figurative language,” define and identify examples of personification and hyperbole, and analyze the effect those figurative language elements have on a text. In this tutorial we will use the prologue from the novel The Book Thief by Markus Zusak to identify and analyze the effects of personification and hyperbole on the beginning of the story. (LAFS.910.RL.2.4, LAFS.910.RL.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/121282

 

Tutorial 9

In this tutorial, you will be working with two poems: William Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and William Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” These poems rely on figurative language and important word relationships to create their meanings. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify examples of figurative language, specifically simile, metaphor, and personification, within these poems. You should also be able to recognize the key word relationships within these poems. Finally, you should be able to explain how each poet’s use of figurative language and word relationships contribute to a poem’s meaning. (LAFS.910.L.3.5)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/122944

 

Tutorial 10

In this tutorial, you will be working with excerpts from Patrick Henry’s “Speech to the Virginia Convention.” By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to recognize appropriate context clues and then use these clues to determine the meanings of words. You should also be able to use dictionary entries to discover additional word meanings and confirm your predictions of what words mean. Finally, you should be able to examine a passage and use all of these strategies to determine the meanings of the words so that you can understand what Patrick Henry was trying to say to his fellow revolutionaries and statesmen. (LAFS.910.L.3.4, LAFS.910.RI.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119024

Tutorial 11

By the end of this baseball themed tutorial you should be able to identify independent clauses, distinguish between conjunctive adverbs and coordinating conjunctions, organize a list of items using a semicolon, and introduce a list or quotation using a colon. (LAFS.910.L.1.2)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119767

Tutorial 12

By the end of this tutorial you should be able to identify an author’s use of common allusions and archetypes. To do this we will first identify common examples for each literary term, then we will identify the similarities and differences between them, and lastly, you will be able to explain how the use of the allusions and archetypes can add to the author’s original text through deepening the characterization used and the meaning of events in the text. This tutorial utilizes an excerpt from the novel A Separate Peace and the story of Cain and Abel from the bible. (LAFS.910.RL.1.1, LAFS.910.RL.3.9)

 

Tutorial 13

Have you ever wanted to make a statement or have your voice heard? If so, you are not alone. Speakers and writers have been working to have their voices heard by making claims since communication first began. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to define what a claim is, determine an author’s claim, distinguish details in a text that develop an author’s claim, and discriminate details and techniques an author uses to refine a claim. More specifically, you will use these skills in this tutorial to closely examine two texts: one by Sojourner Truth and one by Harriet Beecher Stowe. (LAFS.910.RI.2.5)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119055

Tutorial 14

In this tutorial, you will analyze how a subject can be represented in a variety of different mediums, both visual, or artistic, and written, or literary. You will learn about some of the common composition features used in visual mediums, such as photographs or paintings. Then, you will learn how to analyze artistic and literary mediums by collecting evidence, making inferences, and using this information to determine the overall message. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to distinguish compositional and literary features in three different artistic mediums including a poster, photograph, and excerpt from a novel. The mediums featured in this tutorial were created during the 1930s and 40s. (LAFS.910.RL.3.7)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/112729

 

Tutorial 15

In this tutorial you will examine a topic in two different formats- a written passage and a video. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to distinguish between details that are emphasized in a passage and details that are emphasized in a video. You should also be able to explain the way the topic is treated differently in a passage versus a video. The topic for this tutorial is Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.(LAFS.910.RI.3.7)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/118810

Tutorial 16

By the end of this tutorial you should be able to do three things. First, you should be able to identify how an author can use fictional characters to give you insights into their own cultural experiences and perspective. Second, you should be able to make inferences about a main character’s perspective and how it is shaped by their cultural experience. Finally, you should be able to choose appropriate evidence from a text to support your inferences. (LAFS.910.RL.1.1, LAFS.910.RL.2.6)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119126

 

Tutorial 17

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to analyze a complex character’s development and explain how interactions with other characters influenced this development. To be successful in this tutorial, you must first be able to cite implicit and explicit evidence from the text to analyze a character’s thoughts and actions over the course of the text. Next, you will learn how to use this evidence to describe how these interactions with other characters influenced the character’s development. Finally, by examining a series of text excerpts from the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, you should be able to analyze Guy Montag’s interactions with other characters and then explain how these interactions influenced his development.   (LAFS.910.RL.1.1, LAFS.910.RL.1.3, LAFS.910.RL.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/121659

Tutorial 18

This tutorial is designed to help you to understand the rhetorical techniques that speakers use to advance their point of view. First, we will explore and answer the questions: What is rhetoric? What is the rhetorical triangle? What are modes? Then, you will learn how to identify and analyze how speakers use rhetorical techniques. Finally, you will identify the point of view in a speech and then explain how it is advanced through the use of rhetoric. You will then practice these skills on several speech excerpts.  (LAFS.910.RI.2.6)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/115359

Tutorial 19

This tutorial is designed to help you examine the organizational patterns authors use in fictional works. These patterns are also known as text structures. You will also analyze excerpts from the story “Ylla”, from The Martian Chronicles, to see how author Ray Bradbury uses these structures and other literary techniques to create certain effects, such as mystery, tension, and suspense. First you will review common text structures. Next, you will learn how to recognize how an author’s use of text structures creates certain effects in writing. Then, you will determine the choices author Ray Bradbury made in structuring portions of the text “Ylla” from The Martian Chronicles. Finally, you will analyze how these structural choices create dramatic effects in “Ylla” such as mystery, tension, or suspense.   By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify and examine common text structures and analyze how Bradbury successfully uses these structures in several excerpts from “Ylla” from The Martian Chronicles. (LAFS.910.RL.2.5)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/105522

Tutorial 20

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify some of the key ways through which authors create mystery, suspense, and tension within a story.  Specifically, you’ll be able to define and explain how authors use the devices of exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to create mystery, suspense, and tension within a story. (LAFS.910.RL.2.5)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/119087

Tutorial 21

By the end of this tutorial: You will be able to define what a theme is and be able to use some key literary elements such as characters, character traits, and plot to help you determine a theme. You will be able to distinguish the difference between themes and topics in a work of literature and how to use topics in a story to help you determine themes. You will be able to determine a theme in a work of literature using an excerpt from Book 12 of The Odyssey and then write a theme statement based on the evidence in the text.  (LAFS.910.RL.1.1, LAFS.910.RL.1.2, LAFS.910.RL.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/100715

Tutorial 22

By the end of this tutorial, you will be able to understand how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.  Remember, explicit evidence is information directly stated in the text.  The author comes right out and tells you the information.  Implicit evidence is information that the author implies or hints at and it is up to you to discover its meaning as you read!   With practice, you will be able to make inferences based on what you’ve read and support your inferences with specific and appropriate evidence from the text. Finally, you will use inferences to determine key aspects of the setting and characterization used in an excerpt (or short passage) from the novel Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. (LAFS.910.RL.1.1)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/100714

Tutorial 23

Examine a text as though you are a detective, looking for clues. You will be able to look at a text as closely as a detective for evidence to support and prove your points.You will be able to analyze what a text says directly and indirectly. You will be able to prove your points with evidence by referring to what is explicitly or directly stated in a text, as well as show what textual evidence you used to infer what the author simply hinted at. (LAFS.910.RI.1.1, LAFS.910.RI.4.10)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/99484

Tutorial 24

By the end of this tutorial you should be able to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information in research sources, identify authoritative sources from a group of varied resources, and dissect a research question in order to identify keywords for a search of resources. You should also be able to use advanced search features to find appropriate sources to address a research question and assess the usefulness of sources when addressing a specific research question. The research topics in this tutorial deal with invasive, non-native species in Florida. (LAFS.910.W.3.8)

http://www.floridastudents.org/PreviewResource/StudentResource/124304